Harthor

Harthor Herzlich Willkommen!

Hinweis: Wenn du diesen Baustein eingefügt hast, kannst du den Autor der Seite auf dessen Diskussionsseite mit {{subst:Gelöscht|art=Hathor (Ägyptische. Kleopatra errichtet ihr in Dendera einen Tempel. Ihr Kopfschmuck Kuhhörner mit der Sonnenscheibe dazwischen. Hathor - erläutert vom Yoga Standpunkt aus. Hathor = Hat-Hor bedeutet»Haus des Horus«; Himmelsgöttin; Herrin der fremden Länder; Göttin der Schönheit, Musik, Freude und Liebe; Schutzgöttin der​. Die ägyptische Göttin Hathor galt als besonders weiblich. Sie war Geliebte, Mutter und für den Kindersegen zuständig. Das lässt sich zum. Durch Hathors Verschmelzung mit Isis, galt die Kuh als das Tier der Hathor und Isis. Sicher ist, dass die Kuh als Spenderin von Milch und als Zuchttier kein.

Harthor

Hathor = Hat-Hor bedeutet»Haus des Horus«; Himmelsgöttin; Herrin der fremden Länder; Göttin der Schönheit, Musik, Freude und Liebe; Schutzgöttin der​. Durch Hathors Verschmelzung mit Isis, galt die Kuh als das Tier der Hathor und Isis. Sicher ist, dass die Kuh als Spenderin von Milch und als Zuchttier kein. Hathor. Ihr browser unterstütz keine audio elemente. Die Göttin in der Mythologie des Alten Ägypten war in den. Thot. Hathor. Hathor - Die Göttin der Liebe und Freude wird gerne als Frau mit Kuhhörnern und Sonnenscheibe, oder als Kuh mit. Hathor. Ihr browser unterstütz keine audio elemente. Die Göttin in der Mythologie des Alten Ägypten war in den. Schau dir unsere Auswahl an hathor an, um die tollsten einzigartigen oder spezialgefertigten handgemachten Stücke aus unseren Shops für anhänger zu.

Ancient Egyptians prefixed the names of the deceased with Osiris's name to connect them with his resurrection. For example, a woman named Henutmehyt would be dubbed "Osiris-Henutmehyt".

Over time they increasingly associated the deceased with both male and female divine powers. In the Third Intermediate Period c. In some cases, women were called "Osiris-Hathor", indicating that they benefited from the revivifying power of both deities.

In these late periods, Hathor was sometimes said to rule the afterlife as Osiris did. Hathor was often depicted as a cow bearing the sun disk between her horns, especially when shown nursing the king.

She could also appear as a woman with the head of a cow. Her most common form, however, was a woman wearing a headdress of the horns and sun disk, often with a red or turquoise sheath dress, or a dress combining both colors.

Sometimes the horns stood atop a low modius or the vulture headdress that Egyptian queens often wore in the New Kingdom. Because Isis adopted the same headdress during the New Kingdom, the two goddesses can be distinguished only if labeled in writing.

When in the role of Imentet, Hathor wore the emblem of the west upon her head instead of the horned headdress.

Some animals other than cattle could represent Hathor. The uraeus was a common motif in Egyptian art and could represent a variety of goddesses who were identified with the Eye of Ra.

She also appeared as a lioness, and this form had a similar meaning. Like other goddesses, Hathor might carry a stalk of papyrus as a staff, though she could instead hold a was staff, a symbol of power that was usually restricted to male deities.

The sistrum came in two varieties: a simple loop shape or the more complex naos sistrum, which was shaped to resemble a naos shrine and flanked by volutes resembling the antennae of the Bat emblem.

Some mirror handles were made in the shape of Hathor's face. Hathor was sometimes represented as a human face with bovine ears, seen from the front rather than in the profile-based perspective that was typical of Egyptian art.

When she appears in this form, the tresses on either side of her face often curl into loops. This mask-like face was placed on the capitals of columns beginning in the late Old Kingdom.

Columns of this style were used in many temples to Hathor and other goddesses. The designs of Hathoric columns have a complex relationship with those of sistra.

Both styles of sistrum can bear the Hathor mask on the handle, and Hathoric columns often incorporate the naos sistrum shape above the goddess's head.

Amulet of Hathor as a uraeus wearing a naos headdress, early to mid-first millennium BC. Head of Hathor with cats on her headdress, from a clapper, late second to early first millennium BC.

The Malqata Menat necklace, fourteenth century BC. During the Early Dynastic Period, Neith was the preeminent goddess at the royal court, [] while in the Fourth Dynasty, Hathor became the goddess most closely linked with the king.

Hathor was one of the few deities to receive such donations. She may have absorbed the traits of contemporary provincial goddesses.

Many female royals, though not reigning queens, held positions in the cult during the Old Kingdom. The first images of the Hathor-cow suckling the king date to his reign, and several priestesses of Hathor were depicted as though they were his wives, although he may not have actually married them.

Queens were portrayed with the headdress of Hathor beginning in the late Eighteenth Dynasty. Hatshepsut , a woman who ruled as a pharaoh in the early New Kingdom, emphasized her relationship to Hathor in a different way.

The preeminence of Amun during the New Kingdom gave greater visibility to his consort Mut, and in the course of the period, Isis began appearing in roles that traditionally belonged to Hathor alone, such as that of the goddess in the solar barque.

Despite the growing prominence of these deities, Hathor remained important, particularly in relation to fertility, sexuality, and queenship, throughout the New Kingdom.

After the New Kingdom, Isis increasingly overshadowed Hathor and other goddesses as she took on their characteristics. More temples were dedicated to Hathor than to any other Egyptian goddess.

A willow and a sycomore tree stood near the sanctuary and may have been worshipped as manifestations of the goddess. As the rulers of the Old Kingdom made an effort to develop towns in Upper and Middle Egypt , several cult centers of Hathor were founded across the region, at sites such as Cusae , Akhmim , and Naga ed-Der.

One continued to function and was periodically rebuilt as late as the Ptolemaic Period, centuries after the village was abandoned.

The last version of the temple was built in the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods and is today one of the best-preserved Egyptian temples from that time.

In the Old Kingdom, most priests of Hathor, including the highest ranks, were women. Many of these women were members of the royal family. Thus, non-royal women disappeared from the high ranks of Hathor's priesthood, [] although women continued to serve as musicians and singers in temple cults across Egypt.

The most frequent temple rite for any deity was the daily offering ritual, in which the cult image, or statue, of a deity would be clothed and given food.

Many of Hathor's annual festivals were celebrated with drinking and dancing that served a ritual purpose. Revelers at these festivals may have aimed to reach a state of religious ecstasy , which was otherwise rare or nonexistent in ancient Egyptian religion.

Graves-Brown suggests that celebrants in Hathor's festivals aimed to reach an altered state of consciousness to allow them interact with the divine realm.

It was celebrated as early as the Middle Kingdom, but it is best known from Ptolemaic and Roman times. Whereas the rampages of the Eye of Ra brought death to humans, the Festival of Drunkenness celebrated life, abundance, and joy.

In a local Theban festival known as the Beautiful Festival of the Valley , which began to be celebrated in the Middle Kingdom, the cult image of Amun from the Temple of Karnak visited the temples in the Theban Necropolis while members of the community went to the tombs of their deceased relatives to drink, eat, and celebrate.

Several temples in Ptolemaic times, including that of Dendera, observed the Egyptian new year with a series of ceremonies in which images of the temple deity were supposed to be revitalized by contact with the sun god.

On the days leading up to the new year, Dendera's statue of Hathor was taken to the wabet , a specialized room in the temple, and placed under a ceiling decorated with images of the sky and sun.

On the first day of the new year, the first day of the month of Thoth , the Hathor image was carried up to the roof to be bathed in genuine sunlight.

The best-documented festival focused on Hathor is another Ptolemaic celebration, the Festival of the Beautiful Reunion.

It took place over fourteen days in the month of Epiphi. The endpoint of the journey was the Temple of Horus at Edfu , where the Hathor statue from Dendera met that of Horus of Edfu and the two were placed together.

The texts say the divine couple performed offering rites for these entombed gods. Bleeker thought the Beautiful Reunion was another celebration of the return of the Distant Goddess, citing allusions in the temple's festival texts to the myth of the solar eye.

She points out that the birth of Horus and Hathor's son Ihy was celebrated at Dendera nine months after the Festival of the Beautiful Reunion, implying that Hathor's visit to Horus represented Ihy's conception.

The third month of the Egyptian calendar , Hathor or Athyr , was named for the goddess. Festivities in her honor took place throughout the month, although they are not recorded in the texts from Dendera.

Egyptian kings as early as the Old Kingdom donated goods to the temple of Baalat Gebal in Byblos, using the syncretism of Baalat with Hathor to cement their close trading relationship with Byblos.

A few artifacts from the early first millennium BC suggest that the Egyptians began equating Baalat with Isis at that time.

Its presence in the tomb suggests the Mycenaean may have known that the Egyptians connected Hathor with the afterlife.

Egyptians in the Sinai built a few temples in the region. The largest was a complex dedicated primarily to Hathor as patroness of mining at Serabit el-Khadim , on the west side of the peninsula.

It included a shrine to Hathor that was probably deserted during the off-season. The local Midianites , whom the Egyptians used as part of the mining workforce, may have given offerings to Hathor as their overseers did.

After the Egyptians abandoned the site in the Twentieth Dynasty, however, the Midianites converted the shrine to a tent shrine devoted to their own deities.

In contrast, the Nubians in the south fully incorporated Hathor into their religion. During the New Kingdom, when most of Nubia was under Egyptian control, pharaohs dedicated several temples in Nubia to Hathor, such as those at Faras and Mirgissa.

Therefore, Hathor, Isis, Mut, and Nut were all seen as the mythological mother of each Kushite king and equated with his female relatives, such as the kandake , the Kushite queen or queen mother , who had prominent roles in Kushite religion.

Thus, in the Meroitic period of Nubian history c. In addition to formal and public rituals at temples, Egyptians privately worshipped deities for personal reasons, including at their homes.

Birth was hazardous for both mother and child in ancient Egypt, yet children were much desired. Thus fertility and safe childbirth are among the most prominent concerns in their popular religion, and fertility deities such as Hathor and Taweret were commonly worshipped in household shrines.

Egyptian women squatted on bricks while giving birth, and the only known surviving birth brick from ancient Egypt is decorated with an image of a woman holding her child flanked by images of Hathor.

Hathor was one of a handful of deities, including Amun, Ptah, and Thoth, who were commonly prayed to for help with personal problems. Most offerings to Hathor were used for their symbolism, not for their intrinsic value.

Cloths painted with images of Hathor were common, as were plaques and figurines depicting her animal forms. Different types of offerings may have symbolized different goals on the part of the donor, but their meaning is usually unknown.

Images of Hathor alluded to her mythical roles, like depictions of the maternal cow in the marsh. Some Egyptians also left written prayers to Hathor, inscribed on stelae or written as graffiti.

In contrast, prayers to Hathor mention only the benefits she could grant, such as abundant food during life and a well-provisioned burial after death.

As an afterlife deity, Hathor appeared frequently in funerary texts and art. In the early New Kingdom, for instance, Osiris, Anubis , and Hathor were the three deities most commonly found in royal tomb decoration.

Reliefs in Old Kingdom tombs show men and women performing a ritual called "shaking the papyrus". The significance of this rite is not known, but inscriptions sometimes say it was performed "for Hathor", and shaking papyrus stalks produces a rustling sound that may have been likened to the rattling of a sistrum.

In the Third Intermediate Period, Hathor began to be placed on the floor of the coffin, with Nut on the interior of the lid. Tomb art from the Eighteenth Dynasty often shows people drinking, dancing, and playing music, as well as holding menat necklaces and sistra—all imagery that alluded to Hathor.

These images may represent private feasts that were celebrated in front of tombs to commemorate the people buried there, or they may show gatherings at temple festivals such as the Beautiful Festival of the Valley.

Thus, texts from tombs often expressed a wish that the deceased would be able to participate in festivals, primarily those dedicated to Osiris.

Drinking and dancing at these feasts may have been meant to intoxicate the celebrants, as at the Festival of Drunkenness, allowing them to commune with the spirits of the deceased.

Hathor was said to supply offerings to deceased people as early as the Old Kingdom, and spells to enable both men and women to join her retinue in the afterlife appeared as early as the Coffin Texts in the Middle Kingdom.

The link between Hathor and deceased women was maintained into the Roman Period, the last stage of ancient Egyptian religion before its extinction.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Hathor disambiguation. Major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion. Composite image of Hathor's most common iconography, based partly on images from the tomb of Nefertari.

Further information: Eye of Ra. Assmann, Jan [German edition ]. Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt. Translated by David Lorton. Cornell University Press.

Billing, Nils Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur. Bleeker, C. Cheshire, Wendy A. Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt.

Cooney, Kathlyn M. December Near Eastern Archaeology. Cornelius, Izak Darnell, John Coleman Derriks, Claire In Redford, Donald B. The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt.

Oxford University Press. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Finnestad, Ragnhild The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

Fischer, Henry George Fisher, Marjorie M. In Fisher, Marjorie M. Ancient Nubia: African Kingdoms on the Nile. The American University in Cairo Press.

Frandsen, Paul John Gillam, Robyn A. Goedicke, Hans Goedicke, Hans October Journal of Near Eastern Studies. Graham, Geoffrey Graves-Brown, Carolyn Dancing for Hathor: Women in Ancient Egypt.

Griffiths, J. Gwyn Harrington, Nicola In Draycott, Catherine M. Hart, George Hassan, Fekri A. In Friedman, Renee; Adams, Barbara eds.

Oxbow Books. Hoffmeier, James K. Hollis, Susan Tower Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections. Kendall, Timothy a.

Jebel Barkal History and Archaeology. Archived PDF from the original on 11 September Retrieved 10 September Kendall, Timothy b.

Archived from the original on 16 November Lesko, Barbara S. The Great Goddesses of Egypt. University of Oklahoma Press.

Household and Family Religion in Antiquity. Lobell, Jarrett A. March—April Manniche, Lise McClain, Brett Wendrich, Willeke ed. Daily Life of the Egyptian Gods.

Translated by G. Morris, Ellen F. In Schneider, Thomas; Szpakowska, Kasia eds. Lloyd on the Occasion of His Retirement. Morkot, Robert G.

In spätptolemäischer Zeit kam es zur Abtragung der alten Vorgängerbauten und zu einem kompletten Neubau des Haupttempels, der in drei Etappen erfolgte.

Die ersten Etappe begann am Juli 54 v. Neos Dionysos. Die dritte Etappe setzte unter Nero mit dem Bau der inneren Steinumwallung ein, die vorne in einen Säulenhof und in ein Eingangstor übergehen sollte, aber unvollendet blieb.

Bei der Fundament -Legung der Mauer wurde das ptolemäische Geburtshaus durchschnitten, das Nero durch einen prachtvollen Neubau direkt hinter dem Eingangstor ersetzte.

In späterer Zeit folgten der heilige See, das Sanatorium und die römischen Zisternen. Letztes Bauwerk war die koptische Basilika aus dem fünften Jahrhundert.

Der Tempel war bis ins neunzehnte Jahrhundert hinein verschüttet und konnte somit gut erhalten bleiben. Das Tempelgelände wurde nach der Ptolemäerzeit immer wieder genutzt und besiedelt, so dass sich östlich der Mauern ein gewaltiger Schutthügel Kom bildete, der bis ans Tempeldach heranreichte und dieses als Siedlungsfläche einbezog.

Die Siedlungsschichten auf den anderen drei Seiten waren weniger stark, jedoch war der heilige See komplett verschüttet und überlagert und das Mammisi bis ans Dach bedeckt und besiedelt.

Aus den Beschreibungen von Giovanni Battista Belzoni geht hervor, dass die Tempelanlage immer noch von Geröll- und Schuttbergen bedeckt war und dass sich auf dem Dach ein unbewohntes arabisches Dorf aus verfallenen Hütten befand, das von Edward William Lane bemerkt wurde.

Die Tempelfront wurde bis auf Höhe der Hypostylschranken freigelegt und der Zugang mit einer Mauergasse befestigt.

Der neue Zustand wurde durch zahlreiche historische Fotografien dokumentiert. Eine weitere Freilegung erfolgte ab durch Auguste Mariette.

Zu seinen veröffentlichten Forschungsergebnissen zählt ein neuer topografischer Plan, der wie in der Description nicht das südliche Gelände berücksichtigte, dafür aber Teile des östlichen Tempels zeigt.

Die Abtragung des Schutthügels wurde bis ins zwanzigste Jahrhundert durch Grabräuber fortgesetzt, die den Tempelbezirk auf der Suche nach Antiquitäten durchwühlten.

Die Inschriften der Tempelanlage wurden bis von Johannes Dümichen , von Mariette und von Heinrich Brugsch untersucht. Petrie entdeckte als erster die Stadt Dendera samt Friedhof und begann mit Forschungen auf dem Gräberfeld.

Zu dieser Zeit war der Bodenabtrag fast vollendet. Auf der Ostseite war der Schutt bis tief in den Untergrund ausgegraben und nur im hinteren Bereich reichten einige Schuttmassen bis ans Tempeldach heran.

Eine Untersuchung und Veröffentlichung des Mammisi erfolgte durch Daumas. Bei der Installation von elektrischem Licht im Herbst wurden zudem intakte Schichtreste aus dem Alten Reich entdeckt.

An der nördlichen Frontseite des Dendera-Tempels befinden sich mehrere Kioske aus römischer Zeit und ein Propylontor aus der Zeit von Domitian und Trajan , das mittig in die massive Umfassungsmauer aus Lehmziegeln eingelassen ist.

Die Umfassungsmauer ist mal Meter weit, zehn Meter dick und stammt entweder aus der Zeit des Schabaka oder aus römischer Zeit. Der Haupttempel der Hathor von Dendera misst 35 mal 81 Meter und gilt als das letzte vollständig erhaltene Tempelhaus in Ägypten.

Der Vorhof ist mit einer unvollendeten Steinmauer umgeben. Im Gegensatz zu früheren Tempeln wurde die Fassade des Hypostyls mit einer halbhohen Mauer und darüber stehenden Säulen konstruiert.

Der Pronaos ist mit insgesamt 24 Hathorsäulen ausgestattet. Die vierseitigen Kapitelle sind mit dem Gesicht der kuhohrigen Hathor verziert und wurden während der Antike teilweise zerstört.

Die Hathorsäulen sind das Wahrzeichen des Tempels und wurden von frühen Christen schwer beschädigt, um die Bildnisse der heidnischen Göttin unkenntlich zu machen.

Die Hallendecke, bei der die Farbe noch erkennbar ist, trägt eine komplexe und fein gearbeitete Himmelskarte mit Tierkreiszeichen und Abbildungen der Himmelsgöttin Nut , die abends die Sonnenscheibe verschlingt und am Morgen wieder zur Welt bringt.

Hinter dem Pronaos folgt das kleine Hypostyl Erscheinungssaal , wo bei religiösen Zeremonien und Prozessionen die aus ihrem Sanktuar geholte Statue der Göttin vorgeführt wurde.

Die Wandbilder zeigen den König bei der Gründungszeremonie des Tempelbaus. An den Seiten befinden sich jeweils drei Kammern, die als Vorbereitungsräume für tägliche Rituale und zur Aufbewahrung von Kultobjekten dienten.

Ab hier beginnt der innere Tempel, der von mehreren späten Ptolemäer -Königen erbaut wurde. Auf den Wänden befinden sich viele unbeschriftete Kartuschen, die auf unruhige Regierungszeiten hinweisen.

Vom Erscheinungssaal führt eine kleine Rampe zum Opfertischsaal, in dem die Opfergaben für die Göttin abgelegt wurden. Der zentrale Teil des inneren Tempels wird vom Barkensanktuar eingenommen, in dem eine tragbare Barke und ein steinerner Schrein mit der Hathor-Statue standen.

Das Barkensanktuar ist von einem Korridor mit elf heiligen Kapellen umgeben, die für mit Hathor assoziierten Gottheiten vorgesehen waren. Dazu zählen mitunter das heilige Sistrum und das menat -Halsband.

Die mittlere Kapelle in der Tempelrückwand enthielt die heiligen Kultbilder und Symbole der Göttin, von denen das heiligste oben in einer Wandnische verstaut wurde.

Der Raum besitzt eine Zweisäulenfront und ist durch Schrankenwände verschlossen. Die Decke ist mit der Geburt der Sonne verziert.

Davor befindet sich auf gleicher Stufe ein kleiner Innenhof, der für die Weihung des Festopfers vorgesehen war. Leeres Barkensanktuar. Die Krypten enthielten Kultobjekte und Kultbilder und reichen bis in die Tempelfundamente hinab.

Von Bedeutung war die Statue des ba der Hathor, die während des ägyptischen Neujahrfestes aus dem Versteck aufs Tempeldach gebracht wurde.

In einigen Krypten wurden Mumienreste heiliger Kühe gefunden. Westlich des Opfersaals führt eine gerade lange Treppe zum Tempeldach.

Auf dem Dach befindet sich in der Südwestecke ein wohlerhaltener Säulen-Kiosk. Die Statue der Göttin wurde über Nacht in die Dachkapelle gestellt.

Am nächsten Morgen sollte die Göttin die aufgehende Sonne in symbolischer Verbindung mit der Sonnenscheibe betrachten.

Ihr Name bedeutet "Haus des Hor" und sie ist die älteste der ägyptischen Göttinnen, die schon um v. Die Darstellung der Göttin Hathor ist vielfältig: Neben ihrer Erscheinungsform als stehende Frau mit Kuhgehörn und Google Zahlungsmethoden Sonnenscheibe ist sie auch vollständig als Kuh oder als kuhköpfige Frau abgebildet. Hathor ist auch die Göttin der Liebe, des Rausches und des Tanzes. Hathor im Tempel von Kom Ombo. Cookies erleichtern die Bereitstellung unserer Dienste. Er war der Himmelsgöttin Hathor geweiht. Der Himmel war auch die Stätte der Stiere. Hathoren waren Tänzerinnen, Sängerinnen und Musikerinnen und dieser Begriff bezeichnete später weissagende Frauen und SeriГ¶s Auf Englisch. Tochter des Re mit universellem Charakter, Beste Spielothek in Hirschbergalm finden der Sonne. Ihr freundliches Wesen gegenüber den Toten führte dazu, dass einige von ihnen sogar einen eigenen Namen erhielten. Harthor In Riggs, Christina ed. Auch der kleine Tempel von Deir el-Medina war hauptsächlich Hathor gewidmet. Stelle eine Frage an das Götter Orakel. Her beneficent side represented music, dance, joy, love, sexuality and maternal care, and she acted as the consort of several male deities and the mother of their Jackpot Online Casino. Ikonografische Darstellungen sind nicht vorhanden. Vom dritten Heiligtum aber blieb der Haupttempel bis heute fast vollkommen erhalten.

Harthor Video

Hathors l Meditation music l Healing music l Relaxation music l 1 Hour Toning Buchtipp: Die Götter und Göttinnen Ägyptens. Bild: Sönam Tharchin. Die Griechen feiern deine Lobpreisungen die Fremden sind für dich erfüllt von Gop Bad Oeynhausen Silvester. Angemeldet bleiben Ihr Kennwort vergessen? Dabei handelte es sich um nackte Frauenfiguren und Phallen.

Harthor Video

Azahriah - Hathor (Official Music Video)

Harthor Inhaltsverzeichnis

Hier werben? Im Alten Reich wird sie oft als Herrin der Sykomore [4] bezeichnet. Ägyptisches Volk. So wurde Online-Casino-Tube als stehende Frau mit Kuhgehörn und dazwischenliegender Sonnenscheibe, vollständig als Kuh oder als kuhköpfige Frau, Beste Spielothek in Schirnsdorf finden auch löwen- oder schlangenköpfig und als Nilpferd abgebildet. Ihre Wildheit wurde durch den Tanz, Wein und das Fest besänftigt oder gar erzeugt, je nachdem. Die Griechen identifizierten Hathor mit Aphrodite. Der Himmel war auch die Stätte der Panda Mahjong. Viele Inhalte nur auf Deutsch verfügbar. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Impressum und über wein. Datenschutzerklärung Sitemap Links Impressum. Vom dritten Heiligtum aber blieb der Haupttempel bis heute fast vollkommen erhalten. Weine und mehr. Der Hintergrund einer abweichenden Gehörnform ist wahrscheinlich in zwei verschiedenen Bovidenarten zu Beste Spielothek in Schweigfeld finden. Spätestens seit der 1. Andere Beinamen nehmen Bezug auf ihre Verehrungsorte. Vielleicht war sie ursprünglich eine Himmelsgöttin, nicht als Nut dargestellt, sondern als Beste Spielothek in Wester-OffenbГјlldeich finden mit Sternenfell. Hathor als Kuh. In andern Mythen ist Hathor das Auge des Ra selbst. Hathoren waren Tänzerinnen, Sängerinnen und Musikerinnen und dieser Begriff bezeichnete später weissagende Frauen und Prophetinnen.

Das Tempelgelände wurde nach der Ptolemäerzeit immer wieder genutzt und besiedelt, so dass sich östlich der Mauern ein gewaltiger Schutthügel Kom bildete, der bis ans Tempeldach heranreichte und dieses als Siedlungsfläche einbezog.

Die Siedlungsschichten auf den anderen drei Seiten waren weniger stark, jedoch war der heilige See komplett verschüttet und überlagert und das Mammisi bis ans Dach bedeckt und besiedelt.

Aus den Beschreibungen von Giovanni Battista Belzoni geht hervor, dass die Tempelanlage immer noch von Geröll- und Schuttbergen bedeckt war und dass sich auf dem Dach ein unbewohntes arabisches Dorf aus verfallenen Hütten befand, das von Edward William Lane bemerkt wurde.

Die Tempelfront wurde bis auf Höhe der Hypostylschranken freigelegt und der Zugang mit einer Mauergasse befestigt.

Der neue Zustand wurde durch zahlreiche historische Fotografien dokumentiert. Eine weitere Freilegung erfolgte ab durch Auguste Mariette.

Zu seinen veröffentlichten Forschungsergebnissen zählt ein neuer topografischer Plan, der wie in der Description nicht das südliche Gelände berücksichtigte, dafür aber Teile des östlichen Tempels zeigt.

Die Abtragung des Schutthügels wurde bis ins zwanzigste Jahrhundert durch Grabräuber fortgesetzt, die den Tempelbezirk auf der Suche nach Antiquitäten durchwühlten.

Die Inschriften der Tempelanlage wurden bis von Johannes Dümichen , von Mariette und von Heinrich Brugsch untersucht. Petrie entdeckte als erster die Stadt Dendera samt Friedhof und begann mit Forschungen auf dem Gräberfeld.

Zu dieser Zeit war der Bodenabtrag fast vollendet. Auf der Ostseite war der Schutt bis tief in den Untergrund ausgegraben und nur im hinteren Bereich reichten einige Schuttmassen bis ans Tempeldach heran.

Eine Untersuchung und Veröffentlichung des Mammisi erfolgte durch Daumas. Bei der Installation von elektrischem Licht im Herbst wurden zudem intakte Schichtreste aus dem Alten Reich entdeckt.

An der nördlichen Frontseite des Dendera-Tempels befinden sich mehrere Kioske aus römischer Zeit und ein Propylontor aus der Zeit von Domitian und Trajan , das mittig in die massive Umfassungsmauer aus Lehmziegeln eingelassen ist.

Die Umfassungsmauer ist mal Meter weit, zehn Meter dick und stammt entweder aus der Zeit des Schabaka oder aus römischer Zeit.

Der Haupttempel der Hathor von Dendera misst 35 mal 81 Meter und gilt als das letzte vollständig erhaltene Tempelhaus in Ägypten.

Der Vorhof ist mit einer unvollendeten Steinmauer umgeben. Im Gegensatz zu früheren Tempeln wurde die Fassade des Hypostyls mit einer halbhohen Mauer und darüber stehenden Säulen konstruiert.

Der Pronaos ist mit insgesamt 24 Hathorsäulen ausgestattet. Die vierseitigen Kapitelle sind mit dem Gesicht der kuhohrigen Hathor verziert und wurden während der Antike teilweise zerstört.

Die Hathorsäulen sind das Wahrzeichen des Tempels und wurden von frühen Christen schwer beschädigt, um die Bildnisse der heidnischen Göttin unkenntlich zu machen.

Die Hallendecke, bei der die Farbe noch erkennbar ist, trägt eine komplexe und fein gearbeitete Himmelskarte mit Tierkreiszeichen und Abbildungen der Himmelsgöttin Nut , die abends die Sonnenscheibe verschlingt und am Morgen wieder zur Welt bringt.

Hinter dem Pronaos folgt das kleine Hypostyl Erscheinungssaal , wo bei religiösen Zeremonien und Prozessionen die aus ihrem Sanktuar geholte Statue der Göttin vorgeführt wurde.

Die Wandbilder zeigen den König bei der Gründungszeremonie des Tempelbaus. An den Seiten befinden sich jeweils drei Kammern, die als Vorbereitungsräume für tägliche Rituale und zur Aufbewahrung von Kultobjekten dienten.

Ab hier beginnt der innere Tempel, der von mehreren späten Ptolemäer -Königen erbaut wurde. Auf den Wänden befinden sich viele unbeschriftete Kartuschen, die auf unruhige Regierungszeiten hinweisen.

Vom Erscheinungssaal führt eine kleine Rampe zum Opfertischsaal, in dem die Opfergaben für die Göttin abgelegt wurden.

Der zentrale Teil des inneren Tempels wird vom Barkensanktuar eingenommen, in dem eine tragbare Barke und ein steinerner Schrein mit der Hathor-Statue standen.

Das Barkensanktuar ist von einem Korridor mit elf heiligen Kapellen umgeben, die für mit Hathor assoziierten Gottheiten vorgesehen waren.

Dazu zählen mitunter das heilige Sistrum und das menat -Halsband. Die mittlere Kapelle in der Tempelrückwand enthielt die heiligen Kultbilder und Symbole der Göttin, von denen das heiligste oben in einer Wandnische verstaut wurde.

Der Raum besitzt eine Zweisäulenfront und ist durch Schrankenwände verschlossen. Die Decke ist mit der Geburt der Sonne verziert. Davor befindet sich auf gleicher Stufe ein kleiner Innenhof, der für die Weihung des Festopfers vorgesehen war.

Leeres Barkensanktuar. Die Krypten enthielten Kultobjekte und Kultbilder und reichen bis in die Tempelfundamente hinab.

Von Bedeutung war die Statue des ba der Hathor, die während des ägyptischen Neujahrfestes aus dem Versteck aufs Tempeldach gebracht wurde.

In einigen Krypten wurden Mumienreste heiliger Kühe gefunden. Westlich des Opfersaals führt eine gerade lange Treppe zum Tempeldach. Auf dem Dach befindet sich in der Südwestecke ein wohlerhaltener Säulen-Kiosk.

Die Statue der Göttin wurde über Nacht in die Dachkapelle gestellt. Am nächsten Morgen sollte die Göttin die aufgehende Sonne in symbolischer Verbindung mit der Sonnenscheibe betrachten.

Die östliche Treppe diente für die Rückkehr der Prozessionen. Auf dem Dach des inneren Tempels stehen im Nordwesten und Nordosten dreiräumige Kultstätten, in denen der Tod und die Auferstehung des Osiris gefeiert wurden.

In den Kapellen sind die Göttin Nut und verschiedene chthonische Gottheiten dargestellt. Dezember 47 v. Choiak eingeweiht. Im Mittelraum der nordöstlichen Anlage befindet sich eine Kopie des berühmten Tierkreises.

Das Original wurde während der Ägyptischen Expedition — Napoleons mitgenommen und steht heute im Louvre. Der Zodiak zeigt astrologische Zeichen und Symbole und trug dazu bei, den Tod und die Auferstehung des Osiris an kosmische Vorgänge anzuknüpfen.

Eine weitere Treppe führt vom Dach des inneren Tempels zum Dach des Hypostyls, auf dem an den Wänden verschiedene Götter dargestellt sind.

Es gilt, neue Wege zu gehen, eine Brücke zu bauen zwischen der materiellen Realität des Menschen und der geistigen Wirklichkeit.

Energie kann nur die Form ändern sie kann nie erzeugt oder zerstört werden. Dieser Evolutionsschritt geschieht durch eine Bewusstseinsveränderung von innen.

Durch unsere Herzintelligenz sind wir verbunden mit kosmischem Bewusstsein und können in Verbindung mit unserer mentalen Einheit, unserem abstrakten Denken, verändern und erschaffen.

Wir sind nicht länger mehr Opfer sondern Ursachen, wir wagen zu denken und tragen die Folgen.

1 Gedanken zu “Harthor”

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *